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Ante Up! Build a Compensation Strategy that Attracts, Retains and Rewards Great People

Ante Up! Build a Compensation Strategy that Attracts, Retains and Rewards Great People

April 22nd, 2016

Across the nation, minimum wage is on the rise. Job creation and candidate shortages are on the rise, too. If you’re serious about attracting — and keeping — top talent, it may be time to take a hard look at your compensation strategies.

Up! Build a Compensation Strategy that Attracts, Retains and Rewards Great People

 

Fact of the Month: Minimum Wage Hikes Boost Real Income and Spending

April 22nd, 2016

Fact of the Month: Minimum Wage Hikes Boost Real Income and Spending

A recent study by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago concluded that, during the quarters following a $1 minimum wage hike, real spending by households with at least one minimum wage earner increases by $700 per quarter.

Fact of the Month: Minimum Wage Hikes Boost Real Income and Spending

Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Leadership Tip of the Month:

April 22nd, 2016

“Paying your employees well is not only the right thing to do, but it makes for good business.”

Leadership Tip of the Month

–James Sinegal, Co-Founder and CEO of Costco

Quote of the Month

April 8th, 2016

“I worry that business leaders are more interested in material gain than they are in having the patience to build up a strong organization, and a strong organization starts with caring for their people.”
-John Wooden

10 negative employee behaviors that undermine success

April 8th, 2016

The essential management challenge is creating an environment where your team can thrive. In order to be the kind of business that people want to work for, you have to have a group of people working for you that come together to get good work done.

Unfortunately, one rotten apple can spoil the whole barrel. One mean, nasty, negative, deceitful person can poison the entire workplace. All of your good work to build up your business can be undone by one destructive person who you allow to keep working for you.

These are the 10 major negative behaviors that simply cannot be tolerated in a productive workplace.

1. Negativity: There is a difference between occasionally disagreeing and always being negative. Some people always undermine your team with their negativity.

2. Unexcused absences: Everyone needs to miss work occasionally, but some people always miss work or miss work at a rate that causes everyone else to double-time it to cover for them. If you allow frequent unexcused absences, you will alienate your good employees and undermine morale.

3. Failure to complete work/assignments: Some people always have a reason why their work is not done. They are full of excuses and spend more time with excuses than they would have spent just doing the work. This again undermines morale by causing everyone else to pick up the slack.

4. Disrespectful or abusive behavior: Everyone will be grumpy or short-tempered on occasion. But there is a difference between having a bad day and being rude and disrespectful. Some people are arrogant and abusive and need to go work for your competitors.

5. Uncooperative or domineering behavior: The political correctness movement has spawned a new breed of bully. These people use gossip, water cooler whispers and social media to undermine your mission. They will smile and agree to your face and then blind copy everyone in the building on a negative email to your boss. If they don’t get their way, they will threaten EEOC violations to bully you into submission. Find out where the whispers start, and you will identify who has to be invited to leave.

6. Failure to give best effort all the time: It is amazing how these same new breed bullies also manage to not get any work done. They won’t give their best effort unless they are getting the glory and recognition they think they deserve. They are selfish saboteurs who clog your work flow.

7. Failure to provide constructive feedback: There is a proper way to train people and a helpful way to give feedback. Crushing a person is rarely a constructive pathway to strong teamwork.

8. Whining: Whining is defined as complaining for the sake of complaining. It is complaining without actively seeking to be involved in the solution. Whining is unethical and destructive. Identifying problems that need to be fixed and helping solve them is good whining. Bad whining is evil and is usually the first sign that someone needs to go.

9. Poorly prepared for work/meeting/group activity: Assuming that the work is valuable and important, failure to prepare yourself adequately to do your job is unethical

10. Subversive behavior: All of the first nine can manifest in a personality that actively undermines your authority by working to destroy the good will between the boss and the employees. Subversive behavior is unethical. If you work for a company that you don’t agree with, you only have two ethical choices. If you are going to accept the paycheck, then swallow your pride and do the job in the manner requested. If you disagree with the way things are being done, then resign and seek other employment. But you do not have the right to take the paycheck and then undermine the programs of your employer. Subversive behavior is the highest form of evil

7 key attributes of highly promotable people

April 8th, 2016

Hank BoyerMonday, April 04, 2016

7 key attributes of highly promotable people

 

As an employee — whether part-time, full-time, contract or otherwise — your day-to-day performance places you in one of two categories: promotable or not promotable. Getting a promotion starts months (or years) before the promotion date.

What makes someone promotable? Here are seven attributes of highly promotable people.

1. Doers, not talkers. Whatever the assignment, task or objective, doers simply get it done right the first time. No drama or excuses, just results. When they do this long enough, people will ask them to take on new challenges. They are often the first one to work and the last one to leave. They don’t quit until the job is done, regardless of what the clock says. Their actions and results do the talking for them.

2. Solvers, not excuse-makers. Promotable people see a problem, look for causes and take actions to solve the problem. You’ll hear them approach their supervisor and say, “I noticed a problem with X, so I’ve tried a couple of things and found something that seems to work,” and then explain what they did and how the results have benefited the customer/department/company. In contrast, nonpromotable people let their boss handle problems, or worse, complain about them.

3. Selfless, not selfish. They are always alert for opportunities to lend a hand to others. They ask for assignments others don’t want, then do them well with a smile. It’s always about the good of the department/customer/patient/company. No job is beneath them.

4. Respectful, not inconsiderate. Promotable people respect everyone, regardless of what they do and where they came from. They never gossip or get caught up in politics. They treat others with courtesy. They practice active listening instead of looking through or past people who are talking to them. They place others first.

5. Outward focused, not self-focused. Promotable people look beyond the task, job description and department — they think about the big picture and how what they do affects everything else. If having to make a choice when at work, they always choose team and customer interests over self-interests. They recognize their own sacrifices are small in comparison to the benefits of encouraging teammates and extending the life of a customer or patient.

6. Givers, not takers. Promotable people set a personal example to give more than what is asked or expected. They consistently produce to a higher standard than is set by their employer. If they see a job that needs to be done, and they can do it, they jump in and do it — they don’t check first to see if it is on their job description. They rarely run out of paid time off and they don’t abuse break times. They never do personal business on company time, which includes taking calls, texting, personal emails, gaming and any other form of personal amusement while they are on the clock.

7. Integrity and trust, not questionable motives. They set a personal example of integrity that is bulletproof. Because they are givers (not takers), selfless (not self-focused) and solvers (not excuse-makers) they have developed an ironclad reputation within and outside the employer. They don’t cut corners, and they always do what they said they would do. They don’t hang out with people of questionable character or motivation. As a result, people trust them with confidential information and the keys to the kingdom.

Every one of the seven qualities of highly promotable people represents an intentional choice to be a leader by doing. And when people commit to promotable behavior and live it out on the job, they never have to worry about their career hitting a snag, or being able to get the best jobs with the best employers.

Fact of the Month: Minimum Wage Hikes Boost Real Income and Spending

April 4th, 2016

Fact of the Month: Minimum Wage Hikes Boost Real Income and Spending

A recent study by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago concluded that, during the quarters following a $1 minimum wage hike, real spending by households with at least one minimum wage earner increases by $700 per quarter.

Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Ante Up! Build a Compensation Strategy that Attracts, Retains and Rewards Great People

April 4th, 2016

Across the nation, minimum wage is on the rise. Job creation and candidate shortages are on the rise, too. If you’re serious about attracting — and keeping — top talent, it may be time to take a hard look at your compensation strategies.

The Five Best Ways to Build — And Lose — Trust in the Workplace

April 4th, 2016

by Dave Bowman, Human Resource Expert

Many experts agree that trust is perhaps the most important element of a harmonious, synergistic and efficient work environment. Organizations that have trust among employees are usually successful, those that don’t, frequently are not.

So, management often asks, “How can we build trust in the workforce, and how can we avoid losing it?” Well, it all starts at the very top, since trustfulness — and trustworthiness — can exist only if top management sets the example, and then builds that example into every department and unit.

I’ve found there are five excellent ways for leaders to build trust into their teams, and five quick ways to lose it. First let’s consider how to create it.

  1. Establish and maintain integrity.

    It is the foundation of trust in any organization. Integrity must begin at the top and then move down. This means, among other things, keeping promises and always telling the truth, no matter how difficult it might be. If its people have integrity, an organization can be believed.

  2. Communicate vision and values.

    Communication is important, since it provides the artery for information and truth. By communicating the organization’s vision, management defines where it’s going. By communicating its values, the methods for getting there are established.

  3. Consider all employees as equal partners.

    Trust is established when even the newest rookie, a part-timer, or the lowest paid employee feels important and part of the team. This begins with management not being aloof, as well as getting out and meeting the troops. This should be followed by leaders seeking opinions and ideas (and giving credit for them), knowing the names of employees and their families, and treating one and all with genuine respect.

  4. Focus on shared, rather than personal goals.

    When employees feel everyone is pulling together to accomplish a shared vision, rather than a series of personal agendas, trust results. This is the essence of teamwork. When a team really works, the players trust one another.

  5. Do what’s right, regardless of personal risk.

    We all know intuitively what’s “right” in nearly every situation. Following this instinctive sense, and ignoring any personal consequences will nearly always create respect from those around us. From this respect will come trust.

All right, that’s the positive. But what about the negative – the five fastest ways to lose trust from our co-workers.

    1. Act and speak inconsistently.

      Nothing confuses people faster than inconsistency. And if confusion due to contradiction is the only constant, trust is sure to fall victim.

    2. Seek personal rather than shared gain.

      One who is out only for him-or herself, especially in a team environment, quickly loses the respect and trust of others.

    3. Withhold information.

      When the communication channels shut down – both top-down and bottom-up – rumors start and misinformation is believed to be real. Then come denials. True information is often too late, or is never offered. Then trust falls apart.

    4. Lie or tell half-truths.

      Untruthfulness is a quick way to break a bond of trust. People may accept it once, even twice, but as the old saying goes, “twice burned…”

  1. Be closed-minded.
    An unwillingness to consider other ideas and points of view, and/or to create an atmosphere of, “it’s going to be my way or the highway…” will certainly cutoff communication and eventually shatter trust.

When we look at the truly successful organizations of both today and yesterday, we find their leaders fostered these five principles of creating trust. Consider the great military leaders of history (Augustus Caesar, Oliver Cromwell and George Washington), as well as the genuinely beloved political leaders (yes, there actually have been some: Joan of Arc, Peter the Great and Gandhi). And then there are the highly respected industrial leaders (Henry Ford, Lee Iacocca and Jack Welch). All of these great leaders built trust among their superiors, peers and subordinates, and it was this that spurred success and greatness for themselves, their units, alliances and companies.