ACA Likely to Change Substantially but Full Repeal Unlikely

November 11th, 2016

Employer mandate and Cadillac tax are among provisions being targeted

By Stephen Miller, CEBS Nov 11, 2016

The day after Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that the U.S. Senate would move to swiftly try to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). “It’s pretty high on our agenda as you know,” the Kentucky Republican told Politico on Nov. 9. “I would be shocked if we didn’t move forward and keep our commitment to the American people.”

But there’s a hitch: advocates of “repeal and replace” of the ACA need 60 votes in the Senate to overcome a Democratic filibuster—and the Nov. 8 election didn’t put that many Republican senators in place (51 Republicans, 48 Democrats, with a runoff election to be held in Louisiana).

“Without a filibuster-proof Republican majority in the Senate, Democrats are sure to make every effort to block any proposal to fully repeal the ACA,” said Chatrane Birbal, senior advisor, government relations at the Society for Human Resource Management.


In light of that challenge, President Trump and GOP congressional leaders are expected to first make a grand gesture of trying to repeal the ACA, and then start negotiating with Democrats on changing the law in ways that can attract enough senators from both parties to pass the 60-vote threshold. Alternatively, Republicans may use the process of budget reconciliation—in which a simple Senate majority is needed to pass measures related to revenues and spending.

Much of the ACA was originally passed by Democrats in 2010 using reconciliation.

“In terms of repeal, even Republicans—including the president-elect—support keeping some parts of the ACA that are popular, such as the insurance market reforms, allowing children to stay on their parents’ plans until age 26 and the ban on pre-existing condition limits,” said Steve Wojcik, vice president, public policy at the Washington-D.C.-based National Business Group on Health, which represents employers.

That said, there are several key provisions that are likely to be targeted for elimination in the absence of full ACA repeal.

Employer Mandate

“The employer and the individual mandate are back on the table,” Wojcik said. The employer mandate requires organizations with 50 or more full-time or equivalent employees to provide ACA-compliant health care coverage to their full-time employees (those working on average 30 or more hours per week) or to pay steep penalties. The individual mandate requires all adults without insurance coverage to buy an ACA-compliant policy or pay a tax penalty.

“Philosophically, employers believe that offering benefits should be voluntary. The mandate goes against that philosophy,” Wojcik said. “But the big issue is that all of the reporting, tracking and other administrative burdens associated with implementing the employer mandate would go away without it,” and these have been an enormous and costly compliance burden for many employers.

Short of repealing the mandate, a fallback could be changing the ACA’s definition of a full-time employee entitled to employer-provided coverage—currently an employee who works 30 hours or more per week—to the more traditional definition of an employee who works 40 hours per week. If that happens, “employers will need to think about whether they are going to take away the benefits that were extended to the 30-to-40 hour people,” said Kim Buckey, vice president of compliance communications at Birmingham, Ala.-based DirectPath, a health care compliance firm.

Eliminating the mandate also would let employers choose whether to offer health benefits as they see fit, and allow them to provide a wider range of offerings including “slim-down plans for part-time employees or in industries with high turnover,” Wojcik explained. The ACA eliminated these so-called “skinny” or “lite” plans that provided low-cost coverage for basic health care but failed to insure against substantial in-patient hospitalization, for instance.

J.D. Piro, New York City-based senior vice president of consultancy Aon Hewitt’s health law group, also expects to see “if not a complete overhaul, certainly a significant revision of the individual and employer mandates.”

How likely is this? “Sixty votes could be hard,” Wojcik said. “If they want to make those changes, they’ll probably have to use the reconciliation process. But they could do it. There is a budget implication for eliminating the employer and individual mandates, as well as some of the taxes that were part of the ACA. I think it’s doable as a result of the election.”

Piro suggest that there may even be enough bipartisan agreement to avoid a nasty fight. “A lot of Democrats have indicated they might be willing to relax the employer mandate,” and some are looking at the individual mandate and whether it has failed to encourage the healthy uninsured to buy health insurance, he noted.

“Whether you have to get to reconciliation in order to beat a filibuster overlooks the fact that there might be some Democrats [in the Senate] who believe there’s a better way to promote coverage than through these mandates,” Piro said. “So we’re a long way from having to make a filibuster or reconciliation determination.”

However, “It’s certainly not too soon for employers to start thinking about the implications that repealing the employer mandate or revising the definition of full-time employees will have on their benefit strategy,” Buckey said. “Once again, there’s going to be a sea-change in employee benefits.”

In the meantime, “the ACA is still the law of the land,” advised Scott Behrens, an ERISA compliance attorney at Lockton Companies, a benefits brokerage and consultancy based in Kansas City, Mo. “Prudent employers will want to continue to comply with the ACA, including the play-or-pay mandate and reporting requirements—Forms 1095-C are due to employees 11 days after Mr. Trump’s inauguration—until formal guidance relieves them of those compliance obligations.”

Cadillac Tax

The 40-percent excise tax on employer-sponsored health coverage that exceeds certain benefit thresholds, set to take effect in 2020, “is perhaps in a category by itself since there is widespread bipartisan support for eliminating it,” Wojcik said. “Employers as well as unions and others oppose this tax as a flawed way to hold down health plan costs. Ultimately, it will just raise the cost of employer-sponsored coverage without attacking the problem, which is the continued growth in health care expenses beyond wage growth and growth of the overall economy.”

“Both Democrats and Republicans have proposed repealing the Cadillac tax,” Piro said.” The upshot: The odds are now greater that the much reviled levy will never be implemented.

But not everyone is certain the tax is dead. “While President-elect Trump expressed support for a repeal of the 40-percent tax on the campaign trail, other legislative priorities including tax reform and the impact of repeal on the federal deficit could result in further delay, modification or replacement of the excise tax,” said SHRM’s Birbal.

For instance, “the tax treatment of employer-sponsored health care benefits could come under scrutiny as lawmakers look to find ways to pay for tax reform and reduce the federal deficit,” Birbal said. Earlier this year, she noted, proposed changes in the tax treatment of employer-provided health coverage were included in the U.S. House Republican’s task force report on health care reform. Trump, however, has not indicated his support for those measures.

Health Reform Update

January 14th, 2014

Several ACA taxes which begin in 2014 are now being passed on to premiums, sixty-one thousand apply for health insurance in Illinois, but new enrollments have few young people, new guidance released for plan designs, and higher deductibles are leaving many underinsured by new plans.ACA Taxes Increase Starting in 2014, Obamacare begins taxing insurance companies — who contend a good chunk of these costs will be passed on to consumers in the form of higher premiums. The new levies include a multibillion-dollar assessment on insurance companies based on their market share, a fee that will be used to compensate insurers who take on the most costly policyholders and a penalty for individuals who decide to remain uninsured.

Sixty-One Thousand Apply for Health Insurance in Illinois in December The Illinois enrollments are up nearly ninefold from November, when little more than 7,000 selected policies, according to federal data released Monday. Nationwide, nearly 2.2 million selected a plan, with the vast majority coming in December.

Guidance on Cost-Sharing Limits, Wellness, and Mental Health Parity in New ACA FAQs On January 9, 2014 the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services (HHS) and Treasury (collectively, the “Departments”) issued an 18th set of frequently asked questions about the Affordable Care Act, including issues raised by that law’s intersection with the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (“MHPAEA”), as well as a grab-bag of other issues.

Older Pool of Health Care Enrollees Stirs Fears on Costs WASHINGTON — People signing up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act’s federal and state marketplaces tend to be older and potentially less healthy, officials said Monday, a demographic mix that could threaten the law’s economic underpinnings and cause premiums to rise in the future if the pattern persists.

High Deductible Health Law Plans Leave Some ‘Underinsured’ For working people making modest wages and struggling with high medical bills from chronic disease, President Barack Obama’s health care plan sounds like long-awaited relief. But the promise could go unfulfilled.

Key Obamacare rule for business delayed for year

July 3rd, 2013

By BRETT NORMAN and JENNIFER HABERKORN |

The Obama administration is postponing the federal health care law’s insurance mandate for employers next year, in a major concession to the business community and lawmakers who have become increasingly vocal about the law’s potential to damage a slowly recovering economy.

The announcement doesn’t affect the main coverage tools in the law — the individual mandate and the new subsidized insurance markets. But it could boost the cost of the law if more people end up seeking subsidies instead of getting covered on the job.

The delay, revealed just as the administration was stepping up efforts to educate the public about enrollment this fall, is at least partial proof of what Republicans have been predicting for months: that the health law is way too complex to be ready to go live in 2014. And that’s a message that may well resonate all through next year – including the 2014 midterm elections.

Those GOP critiques picked up immediately.

“Obamacare costs too much and it isn’t working the way the administration promised,” Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said after Treasury announced the one-year delay. “And while the White House seems to slowly be admitting what Americans already know, and what I hear consistently in my travels around Kentucky regarding the regulatory burden on employers, the fact remains that Obamacare needs to be repealed and replaced with common-sense reforms that actually lower costs for Americans.”

Speaker John Boehner’s press secretary Brendan Buck tweeted simply: “Obamacare. Such a train wreck.”

“Absolutely thrilled by #ObamaCare delay,” Republican operative Brad Dayspring tweeted. “Will help #GOP candidates across the board in 2014. Debate will be a repeat of 2010.”

The Treasury Department, which is in charge of the employer mandate, said it recognized that the steps businesses have to take to show they were complying with the rules were complex and a burden. Treasury said it would try to streamline them over the next year.

There will be no penalties in 2014 for businesses that don’t cover workers. Most large businesses do cover their workers. Small businesses, with fewer than 50 workers, were already exempt from the rule.

The delay was announced as Washington was already emptying for the July 4 holiday. It comes in the shadow of a mounting pile of criticisms of the employer mandate. There’s been a push by some business groups and lawmakers so that only people workig 40 or more hours a week would be covered. The health law currently says 30 hours is full time, and some businesses and more recently, school districts, have complained that they would have to cut their employees hours to escape the mandate penalties.

The move is also likely to raise the prices tag of Obamacare by making more people eligible for subsidies, namely those whom employers would have covered under the threat of penalties under the law. Employers with 50 or more “full-time equivalent” employees were required under law to provide affordable insurance or else pay $2,000 per year penalty per employee.

The employer mandate’s penalties were expected to reduce the deficit by $5 billion in 2014, according to a Congressional Budget Office estimate published in February.

Obamacare and Your Contingent Staff

May 7th, 2013
 In the wake of massive healthcare reform, employers are now using contingent workers to control healthcare costs. Here are four smart strategies for staying compliant when using temporary, contract or leased employees.
Survive the ACA

ADP Research Institute: Just Over Half of Eligible Part-Time Workers at Large Companies Elect Health Care Coverage

February 5th, 2013

Reuters (02/04/13)

The ADP Research Institute’s 2012 Study of Large Employer Health Benefits, based on data from about 300 nonunion U.S. companies employing 1,000 or more workers, reveals that 68% of the full-time work force selected employer-sponsored health coverage, versus 8% of the part-time work force. However, the number of part-time employees eligible for benefits is expected to rise in 2014, as the Affordable Care Act specifies that employees who work at least 30 hours per week or 130 hours per month are automatically eligible for employer-sponsored health plans. The study also shows that employers with more than 5,000 workers pay 14% less in health insurance premiums as a group than employers with 1,000 to 2,499 employees.